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Contest for people wanting to be organic farmers



Winnipeg Free Press

Young, wannabe organic farmers have one more week to enter a local contest which will award one of them $1,000 and plenty of advice on how to achieve their goal.

The "So You Want To Be an Organic Farmer Contest" is organized by the Organic Food Council of Manitoba’s Manitoba Farm Mentorship Program.

Entrants, who must be between the ages of 18 and 25 years, must explain in 500 words or less why they want to be an organic farmer and how $1,000 could help them achieve their goal.

School children teach organic farming to troops



La Vida Locavore

In May of 2010, a group of northern New Mexico middle school students helped to train the 2nd 45th Agricultural Development Team of the Oklahoma National Guard techniques of organic permaculture farming. The youngsters showed troops how to milk goats, clean eggs and care for bees in preparation for their deployment to Afghanistan in September, 2010. The three week training was coordinated by the Pojoaque, NM-based Permaculture Institute.

Finally, Good News About the Future of Food



Rodale.com

A new documentary offers an upbeat look at organic agriculture through entertaining talks with organic farmers.

The Backyard Battlefield: Grow your own organic food to fight climate change



Sustainable Food

It's not too hard to imagine what kinds of scary changes our food-producing farms will face as our global climate changes. A drop or rise of a few degrees, drought, shifting pest and weed habitats, or increased flooding could spell disaster for crops worldwide. While there's certainly no quick-fix to quell climate change, it is important to recognize that your own backyard garden plays a part in the fight against climate change.

Secret organic weapon for weeding



The Huffington Post

Yes, it's that time of year, when weeds arise and rise again. Even the most devout organic gardener might be tempted to pull out the evil chemicals at times--especially when it comes to those hard-to-weed places like cracks in between rocks and gravel walkways, where there's no food growing that could be tainted by a toxic treatment. But now, thanks to the advice of an old friend of mine, Nancy Small, I have a new solution. A very simple, easy solution.

I use a teapot.

New York School Pesticide Bill Becomes Law



Safelawns.org

Natural lawncare advocates are celebrating the signing of a tough anti-pesticide bill by New York Governor David Paterson. The Child Safe Playing Fields Act, which bans the use of chemical pesticides on school playing fields and playgrounds, is being called “historic” by the founder of SafeLawns.org, North America’s leading natural lawncare advocacy group.

Container gardening yields a variety of vegetables



Revelstoke Times Review

Mention “container gardening” and most people will automatically think of flowers, but recently, vegetables too have found their way into the world of container gardening.

Genetically modified crops: once-minor bug now a big problem for Chinese cotton



Los Angeles Times

The widespread planting of a genetically engineered crop designed to withstand a menacing pest has had the unanticipated consequence of transforming benign bugs into agricultural predators, according to a new study.

In findings that drive home the difficulty of trying to stay one step ahead of nature, scientists explain how farmers of bioengineered cotton in northern China were able to drastically reduce their insecticide use for more than a decade, only to find themselves spraying a crop that wasn't supposed to need such measures.

Reaping benefits in the corporate garden



The New York Times

HERE at the world headquarters of PepsiCo, the masterminds behind $60 billion worth of Mountain Dew, Cheetos and Rice-A-Roni roam polished hallways.

But a five-minute walk away is the organic corporate vegetable garden, where spreadsheets and performance reviews give way to basil starts and black peppermint plants. Employees can sneak out for a quick lunchtime weeding session and cart home the harvest.

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