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Why choose organic cotton?



GotApparel.com

With the trend toward eco friendly apparel growing, the use of organic fibers, specifically organic cotton, is growing as well. The Organic Trade Association (OTA) reports that in 2009, organic fiber sales in the U.S. grew by 10.4 percent over the previous year, reaching $521 million. The future looks promising as well, with organic fiber products appearing in more mainstream outlets, led by large U.S. textile retailers.

But why should consumers consider organic cotton products?

Study: Organic strawberries beat conventional



KPLU Local News

The strawberries were picked, packaged and shipped to Spokane, all on the same day, so the berries would all be comparable. Reganold's team then ran a series of tests. They found the organic berries were higher in micro-nutrients, including vitamin C and antioxidants. The organic berries lasted up to a day longer on the shelf before getting moldy, which was a surprise. Plus, they have no pesticide residue, and they leave the soil in healthier shape. One test scanned for DNA in the soils, and found much richer biodiversity in the organic soils.

Socially Responsible Clothing



Your Super Natural Life

Bena Burda, owner and president of Maggie’s Organics, the nation’s oldest organic cotton clothing company, talks about the impact of non-organic cotton — one of the most highly sprayed crops on the planet. She shares about the apparel industry’s treatment of women, its poor working conditions and how her company is the first apparel company ever to become Fair Labor Certified. Bena is a pioneer who is really making a difference on the planet. MaggiesOrganics.com

Do your part: picking organic cotton



Environment

We all have a favorite T-shirt. It's soft and comfy and it's usually made of cotton. But do you know that the way most cotton is grown is really bad for the environment? Do Your Part by seeking out products made from organic cotton. Trust me, you'll have more incentive than ever once you really understand the toll it takes on our planet to make an average T-shirt.

Bulk is green



Bulk is Green Council

Moral fabric: Clothiers go organic



AdWeek

Six years ago, David Basson got a phone call that most manufacturers can only dream about -- one from Walmart.

Organic cafe for pets



Stuff.co.nz

Organic chicken risotto and bolognese are popular dishes at Chew Chew restaurant, and patrons can't get enough of the frothed goats milk cappuccino sprinkled with dried liver treats.

Chew Chew, in Wollstonecraft on Sydney's lower north shore, specialises in organic pet food for cats and dogs.

It's run by pet nutritionist Naoko Okamoto, who also offers a home delivery service for pampered pets.

Okamoto says food is the most important element of a pet's health.

What's so bad about non-organic cotton



The Good Human

There’s a lot “bad” about conventionally grown cotton—cotton grown with the aid of synthetic chemicals, that is. The Organic Trade Association (OTA), a nonprofit trade group representing America’s burgeoning organic cotton industry, considers cotton “the world’s dirtiest crop” due to its heavy use of insecticides. The nonprofit Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) reports that cotton uses 2.5 percent of the world’s cultivated land yet uses 16 percent of the world’s insecticides—more than any other single major crop.

Farmers markets growing like weeds around the country



Grist.com

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced today that there are now 6,132 farmers markets in the country, up 16 percent from last year and a stunning 214 percent increase since 2000.

Finding organic cotton



Health Digest News

There’s a lot “bad” about conventionally grown cotton—cotton grown with the aid of synthetic chemicals, that is. The Organic Trade Association (OTA), a nonprofit trade group representing America’s burgeoning organic cotton industry, considers cotton “the world’s dirtiest crop” due to its heavy use of insecticides. The nonprofit Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) reports that cotton uses 2.5 percent of the world’s cultivated land yet uses 16 percent of the world’s insecticides—more than any other single major crop.